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Hello,

I may have dead rats underneath the woodwork, underneath the walls in the house. What should I do and what product can I use? Will the smell go away? And is the smell of ammonia resemble dead rats ? Your help is greatly appreciated.

If you read through our RAT CONTROL ARTICLE, you’ll learn that the use of a rodenticide in the home will many times lead to an animal dying somewhere inaccessible. But the general rule is anytime you have any kind of animal active in or around your home, there will be an increased risk of something like this happening. Fortunately there are some good products that can remove the smell.

For now read our article. As you’ll learn, removing the animal is always best. But if you’re not able to find it, you’ll have to treat with the NNZ we list in the article. You can spray it out over the area where you suspect the odor is located but if it’s a wall or ceiling void, you may need to use one of the FOAMERS to get good coverage.

Dead Rat Odor Article:  http://www.roof-rat-control.com/rat-control#dead_rat_odor

NNZ:  http://www.bugspraycart.com/sanitizer/liquid/nnz-64-oz

Foamer:  http://www.bugspraycart.com/equipment/foamers/solo-2-gal-foamer-w12-inj

Rat Control Article:  http://www.roof-rat-control.com/rat-control

 

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We just bought a house and the attic was infested with roof rats. The pest control company has heavily baited and it has been two weeks & there seems to be no more rat activity. The problem is that he said it was the worst rat urine problem that he had ever seen! It must have been going on for several years. How do we neutralize this rat urine up in the attic that has soaked into the insulation? Or will I have to have all of my insulation removed and new insulation put in which will be a large expense that we were not counting on. Please advise us. Thanks.

There is no doubt roof rats can create a mess along with some nasty, foul and biologically unhealthy odors. Locally we have companies that specialize in insulation removal due to odor problems similar to what you’ve described. In my mind, removing the contaminated material is the only way to go. I suggest you remove as much as possible and then vacuum with an industrial shop vac to get anything loose. I also recommend using a RESPIRATOR, RUBBER GLOVES and DISPOSABLE COVERALLS to insure anyone working in this environment avoids the hazardous contaminates undoubtedly present.

I then suggest treating with the NNZ ODOR NEUTRALIZER. It does a great job of breaking down and eliminating odors and is very effective on both rodent droppings and their gland scent which undoubtedly is distributed throughout your attic space. I’d let the area sit for a few days before I reinsulated just to make sure the treatment was effective and to your satisfaction. In most cases we find people have to treat just once but in extreme situations a second spraying may be required. Based on the description you provided, that might be in order for you home.

On a side note, hiring a service company for this task will no doubt be quite expensive. I wouldn’t be surprised if it would be a couple of thousand dollars depending on where you live, the size of the attic and some other factors. Doing it yourself would be a huge cost savings but obviously it will require some hard work. If you’re interested in more information, read up on the products mentioned above by following these links. You can also give us a call to discuss this matter at any time on our toll free 1-800-877-7290.

Here are the links:

Respirator:  http://www.bugspray.com/catalog/products/page706.html

Rubber Gloves:  http://www.bugspray.com/item/nitrile_gloves.html

Disposable Coveralls:  http://www.bugspray.com/item/large_disposable_coveralls.html

NNZ Odor Neutralizer:  http://www.bugspray.com/catalog/products/page877.html

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Aloha,

I have a dead rat in the refrigerator. We have looked under and behind and removed tile under appliance but cannot locate it. We think it is probably in the motor housing or up inside some insulation. We can’t lay the refrigerator down without causing damage due to it’s design and size. This is a new appliance. Do you have any suggestions on how to control the terrible odor?

Thanks

Rats and mice will many times seek out tight places to hide. Motor housings and the surrounding environment are prime locations and as the cold of winter sets in, rodents will come inside looking for these exact locations. They generally offer warmth and moisture as well as a secure location to keep them protected from predators and the harsh season outside. These same locations also have a lot of hazards including electrical and mechanical parts which can end a small rodents life abruptly.

When rats or mice die in an appliance such as a refrigerator, a bad odor will usually alert the homeowner of it’s presence. At that point the dead rodent should be found and removed. If it cannot be found and removed, treating the motor and other components of the appliance can be done with some NNZ ODOR NEUTRALIZER. This product can be sprayed lightly over the housing, compartment and surrounding area. With any luck it will trickle down into key voids or spaces where the dead animal is nestled. Expect to repeat treatments daily till the carcass is decomposed.

If you have other rodent questions, consult our online RAT CONTROL ARTICLE or call us troll free at 1-800-877-7290.

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I noticed some large droppings on my barbecue grill a few weeks ago. I didn’t know what left them but I cleaned the grill out and was hesitatant to even use it. Then I found them again!! Whatever it is seems to like something up in the grill and is grossing me out thinking what they are doing on the grill. Do I need to throw it away and what would crawl up into my grill looking for food?

The droppings you are finding are most likely being left by a roof rat. As explained in our ROOF RAT CONTROL article, they are resourceful and will eat almost anything a human would eat. Additionally, the odor from any grill will surely lure roof rats active in the area to at least investigate what it is that smells so good. Roof rats commonly feed on nut trees and bird feeders and if any are close by are it highly likely they are in the vicinity. This means it will only be a matter of time before a rat or two made it’s way to your grill and it sounds like this has happened already.

At this time I suggest you do a good inspection of the area to see where there might be a localized rodent population that’s active. If this is on your property, I suggest you diminish the activity by using a LIVE TRAP. Failure to do so will almost certainly lead to more activity on the grill and ultimately activity in the home.

As for the grill, I would refrain from using it till the problem is resolved. You could spend some more time cleaning it but I’m afraid until you remove the local rodent activity, they’ll just come back over and over thus contaminating the grill every time they walk over it. Rats carry a lot of disease and when they move on or around objects like grills they deficate and urinate to leave scent trails. So unless you remove them for good, the grill will just get contaminated over and over since the smell of food it releases will cause the rats to keep coming back. When you are sure the problem has been resolved, a good cleaning with the NNZ will remove the scent trails which in turn will make it a lot less likely that any rodents will find it so easily in the future. Of course you can throw it away but remember, if you don’t keep the new one clean and free of odor, it too will attract rodent activity at some point.

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I’ve got a dead rat in a drainage pipe that comes down from my rain gutters. I want to take the pipe down and remove the rat but I need something to spray for the dead body odor. What can I use?

The best product for this application would be the NNZ. It works great on dead body odor. Once the pipe is taken down and the rat removed, just pour 1 gallon of the mixed NNZ through the pipe. The odor will be gone pretty much instantly.