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I see rats running on my roof and want to trap them but I don’t think they will work up there. The shingles are slippery and it’s not flat. Can I use a one of our live traps effectively on my roof?

Live traps can be used most anywhere if the target animal is active and the trap is both secured and baited with something that will get the animal inside. The use of a live trap out in the open, where animals are foraging and running, can certainly work. The following image shows a good trap set on a slanted roof. In this situation, the targeted animals were leaving the attic from the corner so placement needed to be as close as possible to their exit hole.

Live Trap Roof Set

The trap needed to be secured which can be done with nails or staples. The only warning here is that it’s best to use silicone caulking when using anything to anchor the trap. Apply the silicone to the nail or screw when it’s first installed. When the trap is removed, don’t take out the nail or screw but instead drive it all the way in. The silicone previously applied will insure the hole is water tight and this practice will keep the roof water tight.

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Is it possible to live trap rats in a tree?

Live traps can be set most anywhere when targeting rats. The most important factor seems to be whether the location is where they are willing to feed. If you suspect you have roof rats or some other rodent active in a tree, chances are high they are finding food on it making live trapping a possibility.

Roof rats will commonly forage on trees which yield nuts such as acorn, pecan and walnut. From these trees they’ll find their way onto rooftops and then inside the structure. If you are seeing activity in trees close to the home, make some live trap sets to help thin the local population. Failure to remove and relocate local activity close to the home will undoubtedly lead to some getting inside. Once inside they’ll be harder to control. This picture shows a good tree set made with one of our a live traps.

Live Trap Tree Set

Good traps to use for this set include our 5x5x16GREEN, LT5518RD and our 3.5X3.5.24REPEATER. All these models can be strapped to branches using plastic cable ties, nails or screws. They can also be anchored with more elaborate mounts like the one pictured above. This is actually a bird feeder mount which serves as a great “ledge” on which to rest a cage trap. Use some PECAN PASTE along with a good quantity of the nuts the host tree yields when baiting. This combination will both enable the rodents to find the trap quickly and give them good reason to enter.

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I am looking for mouse repellent for use in our substation and communications buildings.

Would probably use inside and outside.

How often does this product need to be reapplied?

Is this available in larger quantities?

MOUSE REPELLENT will generally last 1-3 months per application depending on the local environment where it’s applied. Outside, it will usually dissipate over 1-2 months for sure. Even in dry climates. If the region where you plan on using it is moist or subject to a lot of rainfall, it may only last 1 month. If you intend on using it such a location, consider making the installation with GRANULE GUARDS to help protect the product and extend the length of time it’s effective.

Inside applications out of direct rainfall and sunlight could last 3 months or longer. Be advised it will release a smell when used inside and can be detected but my guess is these substations aren’t manned so it’s probably not an issue.

The largest size currently is the 28 lb PAIL. But we also carry a snake repellent which has the same exact ingredients. This product is available in large 236 lb Tubs though we don’t list this size on line in our cart. You can see the 28 lb pail and here are links to their respecitve labels:

SNAKE AWAY LABEL

RAT AWAY LABEL

As you can see, they are identical in composition. The large size is commonly acquired used by professionals who use it for various pest control services. It’s the same exact material but just has a different target animal on the outside label. Cost per 236 lb tub is $400.00 but we do extend our 5% online ordering discount to call in orders for this big size which drops the price to $380.00 or $1.61 per lb compared to $3.39 per lb for the 28 lb tub.

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I’m a previous purchaser, but need clarification before I make another purchase.

Products: Your web site shows two rat zappers; A) classic (822843) and B) Ultra (822851)

Questions:
1. Item A costs $50.00 each and B costs $65.00. Are the two units identical in size and construction?
2. Are the cases made out of plastic or metal?
3. If one rodent enters and is zapped, is the plate still charged and is capable of zapping a second rodent entering the enclosure?
4. Where is the bait placed?

Regarding the Classic Blue Rat Zapper #A that cost $50.00
5. Question: What are the advantages or disadvantages of buying the Classic versus the Ultra?

Appreciate if you provide answers that are keyed to each number of the questions posed: (1-5).

Thank your,
D.W.

Here are my answers…

1) The two units are close to being equal in size and shape. The Ultra, because it houses larger batteries, is slightly bigger and bulkier.

2) Mostly they are plastic with some metal inside. Mind you this is mainly for electrical current and not structurally needed.

3) Single “kill” at a time; once “contact” is achieved and the trap goes through it’s electrical circuit cycle, it will effectively be “off”. It will then need to be emptied and reset.

4) Bait is placed in the “back” of the device which is based on the fact that it only has one side entry point. To bait properly, lure will be placed through the side entrance and all the way to the back of the device onto a small “safe” area.

5) The Classic is the old original which runs on less power and is fine for small animals. If you have a multitude of animal sizes you will be targeting, the ability to use different batteries will enable you to use power based on target animals. The Ultra uses the larger, longer lasting batteries but this will be it’s only choice of power. Quite frankly I see no reason why anyone would choose the Classic but if you are certain you’ll only need either for “light” duty, the Classic will be do the job fine. But for commercial or high demand use, the Ultra is best suited.

Hope this helps but if not, please give us a call at 1.800.877.7290 and we’ll be glad to discuss any more questions or concerns at that time.

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I noticed some large droppings on my barbecue grill a few weeks ago. I didn’t know what left them but I cleaned the grill out and was hesitatant to even use it. Then I found them again!! Whatever it is seems to like something up in the grill and is grossing me out thinking what they are doing on the grill. Do I need to throw it away and what would crawl up into my grill looking for food?

The droppings you are finding are most likely being left by a roof rat. As explained in our ROOF RAT CONTROL article, they are resourceful and will eat almost anything a human would eat. Additionally, the odor from any grill will surely lure roof rats active in the area to at least investigate what it is that smells so good. Roof rats commonly feed on nut trees and bird feeders and if any are close by are it highly likely they are in the vicinity. This means it will only be a matter of time before a rat or two made it’s way to your grill and it sounds like this has happened already.

At this time I suggest you do a good inspection of the area to see where there might be a localized rodent population that’s active. If this is on your property, I suggest you diminish the activity by using a LIVE TRAP. Failure to do so will almost certainly lead to more activity on the grill and ultimately activity in the home.

As for the grill, I would refrain from using it till the problem is resolved. You could spend some more time cleaning it but I’m afraid until you remove the local rodent activity, they’ll just come back over and over thus contaminating the grill every time they walk over it. Rats carry a lot of disease and when they move on or around objects like grills they deficate and urinate to leave scent trails. So unless you remove them for good, the grill will just get contaminated over and over since the smell of food it releases will cause the rats to keep coming back. When you are sure the problem has been resolved, a good cleaning with the NNZ will remove the scent trails which in turn will make it a lot less likely that any rodents will find it so easily in the future. Of course you can throw it away but remember, if you don’t keep the new one clean and free of odor, it too will attract rodent activity at some point.

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You just have so many items and reading so I will simply ask a question. I have been having critters of unknown types chewing on my ac hoses under the house. They nest in and around the heating and cooling ducts and vents. I can not crawl under the house but is there something general I could use through a garden sprayer or apply to perimeter of house that wont wash away? Thanks for your help.

I suspect you have some kind of rat though it could be a shrew or vole. Without knowing for sure, making a specific recommendation is tough. That being said, there some things you can do.

First, you could treat the hoses and pipes with some 4-THE-BIRDS LIQUID which would effectively stop the chewing immediately. This product is odorless but something no animal can tolerate. Where applied, they will stay away.

Second, I would set some food out in the area like bird food or pet food (if you have a dog or cat, either of their food would suffice). If this “animal” takes the offering, I would then say to get a live trap to catch the ones living inside your home. Once these are removed, you could then find their access points and seal these holes up to prevent more of this animal from coming into your home. Clearly you have a problem with something entering and my guess is there is some kind of food motivating them to get inside. Trap out what you have now before you start sealing up entry points; once you are sure all the current ones active are removed you can do the closure needed to keep new ones from getting inside.

Please call on our toll free 1.800.877.7290 if you have further questions.

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I have pack rats eating my outdoor cushions.  Can this be used on fabric without problems?

Clearly rats like to chew things as explained in our RAT CONTROL ARTICLE. This is quite normal out in the wild but when they are allowed to exist in close proximity to a building, chances are high that the building itself or something around or inside the building will become a “chew” target. My guess is there must be something close by which is luring them in like bird seed, pet food or some other abundant food source. If rats are frequenting your yard for food, chewing and gnawing will be a problem.

To stop them from chewing something specific, give it a good dose of ROPEL SPRAY. This bad tasting agent will get them to stop and move on to something more palatable. And take the time to treat anything else close by you think they might target. Likely objects rats like to chew include house siding, small trees, automobiles, garden hoses and most any yard furniture.

Ultimately you might have to either restrict the amoun of food available in the area to help cut down on the rat activity. If this can’t be done, one of the trapping methods used to reduce the local population might be in order. Rats chewing furniture cushions isn’t nearly as bad compared to what can happen once they target house wiring and other sensitive objects.

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hi, i just recently received a bunch of powder and various liquids from you all. i have thus far only used the aerosol cans for the removal of our aromatic friends the stink bug. i was telling my neighbor how wonderful the spray was working when he motioned me over and said, think they have anything for this?
something either mouse, rat or squirrel keeps eating the wiring harnesses on his truck and now his flat bed trailer. his work van and his wife’s car, because of being driven daily, have not had this happen to date but who knows. I’m right next door have and several items that sit a good bit but haven’t had an issue. that’s why i am doing the correspondence; he didn’t want whatever is doing this to read his e-mail.

There are several animals that could be doing this. The most common is the roof rat. They need to chew on things to grind their teeth as explained in our ROOF RAT CONTROL article. Radiator hoses, electric wiring and most any thin pipe or tube under a car hood has proven to be a likely target in our experience.

There are a few things that can be done to stop the problem. The simplest is to set out a LIVE TRAP up under the vehicles. Foraging rodents will find it, get caught and can then be relocated away from the property. Use our LOGANBERRY PASTE as bait and along with either bird seed or dog food, you’ll quickly catch the culprit.

ULTRA SOUND is another good option. Set out the TRANSONIC every night and it will definitely keep any animal away. Use a timer to have it operate only during the night and you can have it be essentially automatic.

ROPEL or 4-THE-BIRDS LIQUID rubbed or sprayed on the wiring will also stop them. But these treatments aren’t permanent and will have to be reapplied as needed.

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I’ve got a dead rat in a drainage pipe that comes down from my rain gutters. I want to take the pipe down and remove the rat but I need something to spray for the dead body odor. What can I use?

The best product for this application would be the NNZ. It works great on dead body odor. Once the pipe is taken down and the rat removed, just pour 1 gallon of the mixed NNZ through the pipe. The odor will be gone pretty much instantly.

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I think I have a rat in my attic. I can hear sounds at night and it seems like they might be gnawing at something. I’m afraid to go up there but I can’t afford any service company to come out. I don’t want to use any poison anyway and that’s all they want to so I guess I have to do something myself. What can I do?

First, review the online Rat Control article we have posted. We have a whole section on using live traps which are actually quite effective for rats. You will have to get up in the attic to set them up unless you know of some place in the living area they are visiting. If you have such a place, you can set out a trap there. Otherwise, the only way you’ll get control of this problem is to get some traps set up in the areas where they are most active and for now, that sounds like the attic.

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Can Ropel be sprayed on fan belts in cars?  Am having problems with rodents in car engine.

Ropel is a bad tasting agent that can be sprayed on many surfaces with the hopes that target animals will find the taste unpleasant enough to stop their chewing. It’s good to use on fan belts to stop rodents that are gnawing and doing damage. If this doesn’t stop them, try one of the Ultra Sound devices we have featured in our roof rat control article. We’ve had good results using them for this exact application.

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Hello,

In my rodent control experience, mice are easy to trap but rats don’t go into boxes.  Do you have success with rats going inside these plastic cages that electrocute them?

Second, how long does it take to electrocute them – is it a slow process?  Thank you so much.

First, we have had great success getting both rats and mice to enter the electrocution devices. One trick that can be used is to set some pet food or bird seed at the entry way without having the device activated. Leave it out this way till the target animals remove your offering. Place some more out but this time place it just inside the device. After they remove this next portion with the trap not activated, set out some more food with it still turned off but this time place the food all the way to the back of the box. We have found they will always enter. Once the food is taken this deep in the box, you can then set some more of the food out but this time do so with the electrocution device armed and ready for action.

Second, you can see our “simulated kill” video which shows in real time the entire process from start to finish.

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I see what I think are rat burrows in my crawl space. There are holes I’m seeing in the soil, about 3 inches wide, and trails which seem to be mostly against the foundation wall leading around two sides in the space. It looks like whatever is coming out of the holes is walking around down there and then coming up into the house!! I haven’t seen anything inside but they must be somewhere. What can I do?

What you’re describing does indeed sound like a rat. Norway rats are most likely to burrow or dig tunnels like you’re describing and they typically will forage up into the living area of the home if given the chance. I suggest you leave everything as is and trap them out.

To start trapping, it would be best if you were able to find or discover where they might be feeding. Typically rats will take advantage of bird seed or pet food. If you have either in the home, do a good inspection where you’re keeping it. Chances are your little unwanted friend is visiting this area and that’s where you will want to place out the rat trap. Look for droppings or other signs.

If you are unable to find any such location, I suggest you place some bird seed or pet food down in the crawl space, as close to the burrows as you can, to first make sure they are active. If you find this placement gets taken, set up one of our rat live traps with the same food in it as bait. In theory, you should be able to trap out all that are living in this area within a few days. Once removed, you can then close up all the tunnels by using dirt and a shovel or something to collapse them where visible. After that, inspect them weekly for a month to make sure they don’t reappear. If you don’t see any in a month, inspect the crawl space quarterly for a year to insure new rats don’t arrive. Since some found their way into the home it’s likely others will unless you set up some rat repellent around the outside of the building but don’t do this till you are sure the ones currently active have all been removed. As explained in our rat control article, the scent left by active rats will tend to attract new ones for a long time.

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I was looking at you roof rat trap selection and I’m trying to figure out which would be best for my situation. I’ve got several up in my attick and I don’t know if I should live trap or kill trap them. What do you suggest?

As our online roof rat article explains, using a kill trap is generally only effective when you’ve got 1-2 animals to trap. This is because rats will become trap shy when they see other rats dead in any kill trap. If you suspect there are more than two rats in the attic, use one of the rat trap live cages to insure trapped rats don’t become suspect of what you’re using. Our live traps will catch rat after rat as long as you fill the trap with seed when making the set. Trapped roof rats should be relocated or destroyed to insure they don’t come back. Once the active population is removed, you can consider sealing off the attic to further rat invasions.